First the ‘GOOD’ news:

Autism treatment in homeopathy is possible: Dr. Khedekar has done extensive research in India and Europe and has helped hundreds of Autistic children. Please take a look at his research paper on Autism in this link here.

Newspaper Editorial

Newspaper Editorial

Homeopathy for Autism will work but slowly over months and years, initial signs of improvement will be observed after 100 days of the first dose.

Autism cure in homeopathy is possible especially in young subjects only between 2.5yr till 10 yrs. The results then get poorer as age advances to puberty.

Homoeopathic medicine for Autism will do wonders without side-effects

Homeopathy given for Autism will show gradual improvement and not sudden but without side-effects so its more advisable to take homeopathy and not just some suppressive allopathic drugs given to reduce hyperactivity. Regular use of sedative medicines may give rise to the child becoming slow, dull and indifferent, especially when taken for more than 1 month.

Treatment of any kind of Autism Spectrum Disease symptoms in homeopathy will do wonders for you but in long term especially when a constitutional remedy is selected.

In Autism homeopathic treatments are easy but only in the hands of an expert. Don’t fall for commercial chains of homeopathic clinics promising you the sky. Always look for homeopaths with MD degree and not just BHMS or LCEH

Always ask your doctor to give references of his improving or cured cases of Autism, then you’ll exactly know what to expect from his treatment.

 

 

Now the ‘NOT so GOOD’ news:

There are several forms of Homeopathy practised around the world.

Polypharmacy: where several remedies or a combination of remedies is given to the patient in repeated doses. The outcome of which is extremely poor.

Classical homeopathy: where a single dose of a single remedy is given and will give you the best results. But please make sure that your homeopath is not giving you and charging for placebo.

Symptom specific treatments: where only the symptoms or the effects of autism are treated. This will also give very poor results. This is also called HOMEO-ALLOPATHY. Tuberculinum or Tarentula will never be able to cure your child of Autism issues.

Classical homeopathy has been used with some success to alleviate symptoms, both mental and physical, or to cure individuals with Autism. For many patients who have seen a large overall improvement in their Autism, homeopathy has played a major role.

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WHAT IS AUTISM?

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people perceive the world and interact with others.

Autistic people see, hear and feel the world differently to other people. If you are autistic, you are autistic for life; autism is not an illness or disease and cannot be ‘cured’. Often people feel being autistic is a fundamental aspect of their identity.

Autism is a spectrum condition. All autistic people share certain difficulties, but being autistic will affect them in different ways. Some autistic people also have learning disabilities, mental health issues or other conditions, meaning people need different levels of support. All people on the autism spectrum learn and develop. With the right sort of support, all can be helped to live a more fulfilling life of their own choosing.

How common is autism?

Autism is much more common than most people think. There are around 700,000 autistic people in the UK – that’s more than 1 in 100. People from all nationalities and cultural, religious and social backgrounds can be autistic, although it appears to affect more men than women.

HOW DO AUTISTIC PEOPLE SEE THE WORLD?

Some autistic people say the world feels overwhelming and this can cause them considerable anxiety.

In particular, understanding and relating to other people, and taking part in everyday family, school, work and social life, can be harder. Other people appear to know, intuitively, how to communicate and interact with each other, yet can also struggle to build rapport with autistic people. Autistic people may wonder why they are ‘different’ and feel their social differences mean people don’t understand them.

Autistic people often do not ‘look’ disabled. Some parents of autistic children say that other people simply think their child is naughty, while adults find that they are misunderstood.

DIAGNOSIS

A diagnosis is the formal identification of autism, usually by a multi-disciplinary diagnostic team, often including a speech and language therapist, paediatrician, psychiatrist and/or psychologist.

THE BENEFITS OF A DIAGNOSIS

Getting a timely and thorough assessment and diagnosis may be helpful because:

  • it helps autistic people (and their families, partners, employers, colleagues, teachers and friends) to understand why they may experience certain difficulties and what they can do about them
  • it allows people to accessservices and support.

HOW AUTISM IS DIAGNOSED

The characteristics of autism vary from one person to another, but in order for a diagnosis to be made, a person will usually be assessed as having had persistent difficulties with social communication and social interaction and restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviours, activities or interests since early childhood, to the extent that these “limit and impair everyday functioning”.

PERSISTENT DIFFICULTIES WITH SOCIAL COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL INTERACTION

SOCIAL COMMUNICATION

Autistic people have difficulties with interpreting both verbal and non-verbal language like gestures or tone of voice. Many have a very literal understanding of language, and think people always mean exactly what they say. They may find it difficult to use or understand:

  • facial expressions
  • tone of voice
  • jokes and sarcasm.

Some may not speak, or have fairly limited speech. They will often understand more of what other people say to them than they are able to express, yet may struggle with vagueness or abstract concepts. Some autistic people benefit from using, or prefer to use, alternative means of communication, such as sign language or visual symbols. Some are able to communicate very effectively without speech.

Others have good language skills, but they may still find it hard to understand the expectations of others within conversations, perhaps repeating what the other person has just said (this is called echolalia) or talking at length about their own interests.

It often helps to speak in a clear, consistent way and to give autistic people time to process what has been said to them.

SOCIAL INTERACTION

Autistic people often have difficulty ‘reading’ other people – recognising or understanding others’ feelings and intentions – and expressing their own emotions. This can make it very hard for them to navigate the social world. They may:

  • appear to be insensitive
  • seek out time alone when overloaded by other people
  • not seek comfort from other people
  • appear to behave ‘strangely’ or in a way thought to be socially inappropriate.

Autistic people may find it hard to form friendships. Some may want to interact with other people and make friends, but may be unsure how to go about it.

RESTRICTED AND REPETITIVE PATTERNS OF BEHAVIOURS, ACTIVITIES OR INTERESTS

REPETITIVE BEHAVIOUR AND ROUTINES

The world can seem a very unpredictable and confusing place to autistic people, who often prefer to have a daily routine so that they know what is going to happen every day. They may want to always travel the same way to and from school or work, or eat exactly the same food for breakfast.

The use of rules can also be important. It may be difficult for an autistic person to take a different approach to something once they have been taught the ‘right’ way to do it. People on the autism spectrum may not be comfortable with the idea of change, but may be able to cope better if they can prepare for changes in advance.

HIGHLY-FOCUSED INTERESTS

Many autistic people have intense and highly-focused interests, often from a fairly young age. These can change over time or be lifelong, and can be anything from art or music, to trains or computers. An interest may sometimes be unusual. One autistic person loved collecting rubbish, for example. With encouragement, the person developed an interest in recycling and the environment.

Many channel their interest into studying, paid work, volunteering, or other meaningful occupation. Autistic people often report that the pursuit of such interests is fundamental to their wellbeing and happiness.

SENSORY SENSITIVITY

Autistic people may also experience over- or under-sensitivity to sounds, touch, tastes, smells, light, colours, temperatures or pain. For example, they may find certain background sounds, which other people ignore or block out, unbearably loud or distracting. This can cause anxiety or even physical pain. Or they may be fascinated by lights or spinning objects.

Read more about repetitive behaviour and routines and sensory processing.

DIFFERENT NAMES FOR AUTISM

Over the years, different diagnostic labels have been used, such as autism, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), autism spectrum condition (ASC), classic autism, Kanner autism, pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), high-functioning autism (HFA), Asperger syndrome and Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA). This reflects the different diagnostic manuals and tools used, and the different autism profiles presented by individuals. Because of recent and upcoming changes to the main diagnostic manuals, ‘autism spectrum disorder’ (ASD) is now likely to become the most commonly given diagnostic term.

CAUSES AND CURES

WHAT CAUSES AUTISM?

The exact cause of autism is still being investigated. Research into causes suggests that a combination of factors – genetic and environmental – may account for differences in development. Autism is not caused by a person’s upbringing, their social circumstances and is not the fault of the individual with the condition.

IS THERE A CURE?

There is no ‘cure’ for autism in the Allopathic system of medicine. However, there is a range of treatments in Homeopathy that can be very beneficial till the child is between 2yr till puberty. Results are not as amazing once they are above 15 yrs of age.

 

Some improving cases of Autism in Europe and in India

 

US consul General, His Excellency Peter Haas giving the award of OutStanding Achiever to Dr. Shreepad Khedekar for his research in Autism and other difficult conditions.

Award presented by H. E. Peter Haas, counsul general USA

What homeopathy costs?

Your first consultation with a private homeopath will usually cost between INR 500 to INR 10,000. Further appointments usually cost less – about INR 500 to INR 5000 depending on the location of the place and experience of homeopath. It will also depend on the skill level of his staff or assistants who usually take the first case and prepare it for the main consultant.

Your remedy will usually be included in the consultation price, but do check this first. Homeopathic tablets or other products usually cost around INR 100 to INR500 if you need to buy them separately in India.

Imperial clinics Mumbai

Dr. Shreepad A. Khedekar, BHMS, MD (homeopathy), a specialist for over 17 years, he has used homeopathy in his Switzerland, Belgrade and Mumbai practice for the last 17 years. He lectures in homeopathy at Switzerland, Croatia and at the Serbian Doctors Association (SLD) Teaching Centre in Belgrade and has a busy private practice in Dadar, Mumbai and at Shushrusha Citizens co-operative hospital, Mumbai and is the only Homeopath in their 60 year history.

Dr. Shreepad Khedekar  is the Clinical Director, Imperial clinics Mumbai and Imperial clinics Belgrade, Consultant at Shushrusha Citizens Co-op Hospital Mumbai and Physician to several international stars and celebrities.

To Know More About autism treatment in homeopathy here.